Gallery/Oriel

Anne-Mie Melis

Slow Landscape

4/10/2018 – 27/10/2018

 

Confronted by rapid changes in our society, driven by technology and global connectivity, how do we develop a symbiotic relation with nature? In her work Anne-Mie Melis uses a variety of artistic mediums and takes inspiration from evolutionary biology, science and our contemporary urban and natural environment. A 300 million year old fossil and 3D printed seedpods are among the specimens she uses in this project to nurture a speculative future nature.

 

“Our time is the “anthropocene,” the age of human disturbance. The anthropocene is an era of mass extinction; we must not forget that. Yet the anthropocene is also an era of emergence. What has emerged? I use the term “contaminated diversity” to refer to cultural and biological ways of life that have developed in relation to the last few hundred years of widespread human disturbance. Contaminated diversity is collaborative adaptation to human-disturbed ecosystems. It emerges as the detritus of environmental destruction, imperial conquest, profit making, racism, and authoritarian rule—as well as creative becoming. It is not always pretty. But it is who we are and what we have as available working partners for a liveable earth. “Slow disturbance” refers to anthropogenic ecosystems in which many other species can live. Slow disturbance landscapes are those that nurture interspecies collaborations. They are not untouched by the presence of humans, the ultimate weedy invader. Still, their biodiversity is comparatively high. I use the adjective “slow” in conversation with slow foods and slow cities; slowness is a dream to encourage, rather than a trait to objectify.” (Ref: Tsing, Anna. “Contaminated Diversity in ‘Slow Disturbance’: Potential Collaborators for a Liveable Earth,” In: “Why Do We Value Diversity? Biocultural Diversity in a Global Context,” edited by Gary Martin, Diana Mincyte, and Ursula Münster, RCC Perspectives 2012, no. 9, 95–97.)

Anne-Mie Melis

Slow Landscape

4/10/2018 – 27/10/2018

Yn wyneb newidiadau chwim yn ein cymdeithas, a chael ein ysgogi gan dechnoleg a chysylltedd byd-eang, sut mae datblygu perthynas symbiotig a natur? Yn ei gwaith mae Anne-Mie Melis yn defnyddio amryw o gyfryngau artistig ac yn cael ei hysbrydoli gan fywydeg esblygol, gwyddoniaeth ac ein hamgylchedd trefol a naturiol. Yn y prosiect hwn, i feithrin natur y dyfodol. mae ffosil 300 miliwn oed a chodau hadau wedi ei arffraffu yn 3D ymhlith y sbesimenau.

Ein amser ni yw’r ‘anthropocene’, yr oes o aflonyddwch dynol. Cyfnod o ddifodiant torfol yw’r anthropocene a rhaid peidio anghofio hyn. Er mae’r anthropcene hefyd yn oes o gyfodiad. Beth sydd wedi ymddangos? Rwy’n defnyddio’r term ‘amrywiaeth llygredig’ i gyferirio at ffyrdd o fyw, yn ddiwyllianol ac yn fiolegol, sydd wedi eu datblygu mewn perthynas i’r rhai canrifoedd diwethaf o aflonyddwch dynol. Addasiad cydweithredol i ecosystemau sydd wedi ei aflonyddu gan ddyn yw ‘amrywiaeth llygredig’. Mae’n ymddangos fel y detritws o ddifrod amgylcheddol, concwest ymerodrol, elwa, hiliaeth, a rheol awdurdodaidd – yn ogystal a ymarferiad creadigol. Nid yw bob amser yn bert. Ond dyma ni, a dyma yr hyn sydd gennym fel partneriaid ar gyfer daear trigadwy.
Mae ‘slow disturbance’ yn cyfeirio at ecosystemau anthropogenig ble mae llawer o rhywogaethau eraill yn gallu byw. Tirweddau aflonyddiad araf (slow disturbance landscapes) yw y rhai sy’n meithrin cydweithrediad rhyngrywogaethol. Nid ydynt heb eu cyffwrdd gan bresenoldeb dynol, yr ymyrrwyr chwynnog mwyaf. Eto, mae eu bioamrywiaeth yn weddol uchel. Rwyf yn defnyddio’r ansoddair “araf” mewn sgwrs gyda bwyd araf a dinasoedd araf; mae arafwch yn freuddwyd i annog , yn hytrach na nodwedd i wrthrycholi.

(Cyf: Tsing, Anna. “Contaminated Diversity in ‘Slow Disturbance’: Potential Collaborators for a Liveable Earth,” In: “Why Do We Value Diversity? Biocultural Diversity in a Global Context,” golygu gan Gary Martin, Diana Mincyte, a Ursula Münster, RCC Perspectives
2012, no. 9, 95–97.)

‘Mae ‘slow disturbance’ yn cyfeirio at ecosystemau anthropogenig ble mae llawer o rhywogaethau eraill yn gallu byw. Tirweddau aflonyddiad araf (slow disturbance landscapes) yw y rhai sy’n meithrin cydweithrediad rhyngrywogaethol. Nid ydynt heb eu cyffwrdd gan bresenoldeb dynol, yr ymyrrwyr chwynnog mwyaf. Eto, mae eu bioamrywiaeth yn weddol uchel. Rwyf yn defnyddio’r ansoddair “araf” mewn sgwrs gyda bwyd araf a dinasoedd araf; mae arafwch yn freuddwyd i annog , yn hytrach na nodwedd i wrthrycholi’
(Cyf: Tsing, Anna)

 

Ronnie Houselander Cook

ONION TOWN

03/10/2018 – 27/10/2018

Onion Town is a fictional bustling metropolis that is based on shapes that are found in day-to-day city life. The work aims to question whether permanent architecture is a fundamental part of the future; reimagining buildings and architecture in a way that suggests they can move under their own free will without consequence.

The growing world requires us to be flexible, so why aren’t our buildings flexible too? An interest in legs and feet has helped depict this idea of movement with plastic feet taking the place of performers.

The materials are tacky, unkempt, provisional with a throw-away aesthetic showing how quickly things can be made. Feelings of awkwardness and an interest in the anthropomorphic qualities of buildings have encouraged this explorative body of work.

Ronnie Houselander Cook

ONION TOWN

03/10/2018 – 27/10/2018

Metropolis bywiog ffuglenol wedi ei seilio ar siapiau dinesig a gwelir o ddydd i ddydd yw Onion Town. Nôd y gwaith yw i gwestiynnu a yw pensaernïaeth parhaol yn rhan hanfodol o’r dyfodol; gan ail-ddychmygu adeiladau a phensaernïaeth mewn ffordd sy’n awgrymu y gallent symud ar ben eu hunain heb ganlyniadiadau.
Mae’r byd yn ein mynnu i fod yn hyblyg, felly pam nad yw ein adeiladau yn hyblyg hefyd? Mae diddordeb mewn traed a choesau yn gymorth i bortreadu y syniad o symudiad gyda thraed plastig yn cymryd lle perfformwyr.
Mae’r deunyddiau yn taci, bler, dros dro gyda aesthetig tafladwy sy’n dangos pa mor gyflym mae pethau yn gallu cael eu creu. Mae teimlad o letchwithdod a diddordeb yn rhinweddau anthropomorffig adeialdau wedi hybu y gwaith ffrwydrol yma.

 

James Green

PAINTINGS OF PLANET EARTH

5/9/19 – 29/9/18

The world is full of things that are just beyond the reach of our senses: ghosts, UFO’s, extra terrestrials, spirits, gods, demons, portals to other universes, other dimensions, and other worlds.

From the beginning of human kind, people have used magic, religion, and art to communicate with, study, and seek the aid of these entities, and these practices are still used all over the world today.

The Paintings of Planet Earth acknowledge these forces that science can only partially explain, and are documents of real experiences that only art can communicate.

Website: http://www.jg-gallery.co.uk

Instagram: jamesgreenufo

Contact: james.green@network.rca.ac.uk

James Green

PAINTINGS OF PLANET EARTH

5/9/19 – 29/9/18

Mae’r byd yn llawn pethau tu hwnt ein synhwyrau: ysbrydion, UFOs, allfydolion, duwiau, demoniaid, pyrth i fydysawdau eraill, dimensiynau eraill a bydoedd eraill.

Ers dechrau dynolryw, defnyddwyd lledrith, crefydd a chelf i gyfathrebu, astudio, a chwilio am gymorth gan yr endidau yma, ac mae’r ymarferion yn dal i fyw hyd heddiw.

Mae The Paintings of Planet Earth yn cydnabod y grymoedd sy’n rhannol anesbonadwy yn wyddonol , ac yn ddogfennau o brofiadau go iawn a fynegai drwy celf yn unig.

Gwefan: http://www.jg-gallery.co.uk

Instagram: jamesgreenufo

Cysylltu : james.green@network.rca.ac.uk

 

Becoming One

Isabella Bilstein + Roz Adams

5/9/18 – 29/9/18

Text by Jamie Stevenson

“Do Not Touch.” Here are words of unchecked power; cold and cruel, insidious in their familiarity. In an age where lies greet the eyes with a twinkling grin, the ability to reach out and feel grows ever more elusive. We are told to believe what we see and trust what we hear, while every advancement in digital technology only increases human capacity for illusion.

To touch, however, is to defy such deception. To grasp something – to feel the weight in your hands and the texture on your skin – is to truly know that thing. As babies, our primal thirst for knowledge begins at the tips of our fingers; we prod and stroke and squeeze and poke our way through the world, consuming everything through its tactility. All these little snippets of sensation come together and fuse in our subconscious, imbuing every familiar sight and sound with the comforting certainty of having felt it somewhere before.

‘Becoming One’ is a collaborative exhibition by metal smith Roz Adams and ceramicist Isabella Bilstein. By interweaving their contrasting individual creative practices, they have fashioned a platform for a layered and tactile engagement with the materials and processes that are central to their work. The sanctity of the finished object is broken down to reveal the rich narrative behind each polished edge and textured glaze, and the viewer is invited to follow the materials on their journey from raw building block to realised outcome. Importantly, care is taken not to disregard all the deviations from that path; the hiccups, the unintended happenings, inevitable by-products of such complex, time-consuming and unpredictable making processes.

The melding of two such distinct practices allows not only for a juxtaposition of aesthetic and form, but also for a unique marriage between the materials in question. Alongside individual pieces, Roz and Isabella have created a series of collaborative works that combine metal casting with functional and sculptural ceramics to create hybrid forms. There is an enthusiasm here not for completion, but for experimentation and discovery. It is a testament to the skill and understanding possessed by these two artists – and the respect they have for their chosen crafts – that they are able to leave the fate of the outcome so firmly in the hands of the materials they use. Two ideas; one alive and molten, one fired into permanence, are buried together in the sand. They emerge as one. They are not greedy; the hungry clay does not devour the pewter’s liquid sheen, and neither does that silver gleam outshine the richness of the earth. Instead, they stand as tactile monuments to conversation and knowledge shared. Here are whole objects with stories not concealed by the illusion of perfection, but laid bare at the surface, well within reach.

 

Pleased to meet you 

03/08/18 – 01/09/18

Arcade Cardiff and gallery RDV join forces in 2018 to create a residency and exhibition across the two spaces. This partnership was born under the impulse of Pascal-Michel Dubois, Board member of Arcade, wanting to create an artistic partnership with the city of Nantes, twinned with Cardiff, and more particularly with the exhibition space RDV. This collective exhibition is an extension of the programming of the RDV gallery by supporting, in its selection, two emerging artists from Nantes, Pauline Gompertz and Stefan Tulépo. They will be accompanied by Béatrice Dacher, Michel Gerson and Jean-François Courtilat.

Elijah Thomas: A Scene Within A Scene

03/08/18 – 01/09/18

‘This is a scene within a scene. Sure, I could call it the Cardiff music scene but this is just a small section of it. This is something a little deeper. A collection of friends bound together by a mutual respect for one another. Some make their music together, some even live together under the same roof but not one band sounds the same. Cardiff doesn’t have a particular ‘Sound’ it’s a mixture of different styles and genres. This is a chance for me to shine a light and say thank you to the bands that helped soundtrack the photographs that I take both on and off the stage. Forget London, forget Manchester, this is Cardiff. Hopefully other photographers in the area will see these photographs and take more notice of their friends playing music. Perhaps maybe you’d like to document them? maybe even put on an exhibition? I’d love to see what you’ve got.’

————————————————

Thank you to Old Blue Last Beer for sponsoring the exhibition.

Helen Grant: Funnul

20/06 – 07/07

FunnuL uses a symbol that commonly denotes the need for caution to instead entice people inside ARCADE. It’s nylon innards are at once an invitation and a warning, highlighting our seemingly inevitable attraction to danger and situations or people that are not necessarily good for us. Its title also references the purchasing funnel, a theoretical model used in marketing to illustrate the customer ‘journey’ from product awareness to purchase. Perfectly sited in a shopping centre, FunneL encourages passers by to step within for a sudden change of perspective and pace.

Helen Grant is an artist based in Bristol. She is interested in the unsaid and understated ways in which we communicate, the humour, mishaps and pathos of human interactions. Her recent work makes use of symbols from familiar yet unfathomable sources: flags and cushions based on archaic naval alphabets, and paintings made from carrier bag graphics.

Helen is also part of Back in 5 Squad, a collaboration who’s dystopian installations ‘Make your eyes and ears bleed’ and she co-runs Test Space, an artist-led project and exhibition space at Spike Island.

PV 20/06 6-8. Open Wednesday to Saturday 12.30 – 17.30

PV 30/05/18. Ar agor Dydd Mercher- Dydd Sadwrn  12.30 – 17.30